Well recognized for their strength in management practices, their initiative and responsiveness to the community needs, Jewish Family Service of Metropolitan Detroit (JFS) and JVS were listed among the four finalists in Crain’s Detroit “Best Managed Non-Profit Competition” for 2014.

The competition recognizes non-profit organizations that implement effective financial and programmatic management practices, while demonstrating innovation in pursuit of their missions. A panel of judges ultimately named JFS partner Common Ground as the winner and Leader Dogs for the Blind as the other finalist.

JFS lauded for Health Care Navigation program

To answer the need for health care for the uninsured, JFS launched Project Chessed a decade ago. The program connected more than 1,800 uninsured adults to pro bono medical services donated through a network of local healthcare providers. With the advent of the Affordable Care Act and Michigan’s Medicaid expansion, the agency saw the need to shift the program’s mission using its health care expertise to launch a navigation program that assisted more than 10,000 Oakland and Macomb County residents in accessing permanent health care coverage in 2013-2014.

Crain’s also acknowledged the Jewish community’s response, coordinated through JFS, to the devastating August floods that affected many in our area. To date, JFS has provided direct financial assistance to 167 families, helping them to clean, remediate and rebuild essential living space at a cost of more than $500,000.

A feature article in Crain’s accompanying the announcement of the contest’s finalists and winner emphasized two JFS exemplary initiatives.

JFS_Flood Triage-3

After the region was drenched by August flooding, Jewish Family Service set up a triage site in Oak Park to process applications for financial assistance. Pictured left to right, Lindsay Leder, Robin Berman and Katherine Hamaoui. Photo, Courtesy of JFS

 JVS leverages its HR expertise to create new revenue streams

With its solid reputation for excellent hiring practices and human resources management, JVS utilized a grant in 2001 to create a joint recruitment program for five other human service agencies in Oakland County that were advertising and recruiting for nearly identical positions. “This innovative partnership saved the other agencies staff and financial resources and resulted in very successful recruiting efforts for qualified candidates,” explained Leah Rosenbaum, JVS President and CEO.

From there, JVS capitalized on the demand for outsourced human resource functions to launch HR Solutions Group (HRSG), a subsidiary providing human resource functions for other nonprofits and businesses. HRSG offerings range from turnkey HR management to specific functions such as managing absences taken under the Family and Medical Leave Act, training staff, developing job descriptions and conducting criminal background and reference checks of potential employees.

JVS senior HR specialist Laura Panoff discusses a new volunteer training program with Chris Allen, CEO of the Detroit Wayne County Health Authority. The Authority contracts with JVS' HR Solutions Group to handle its HR functions. Photo: Courtesy of JVS

JVS senior HR specialist Laura Panoff discusses a new volunteer training program with Chris Allen, CEO of the Detroit Wayne County Health Authority. The Authority contracts with JVS’ HR Solutions Group to handle its HR functions. Photo: Courtesy of JVS

HRSG manages human resource functions for 1,000 employees at 13 organizations including Gleaners Community Food Bank of Southeastern Michigan, Detroit Wayne County Health Authority, Alternatives for Girls and Signal Restoration Services.

“With our team of experts taking care of the HR work, these organizations can focus more time and resources on accomplishing their own missions,” said Rosenbaum. “We are helping them operate more efficiently and remain competitive by hiring the best qualified people. At the same time, HRSG provides a funding stream to help support JVS mission-based programs.”

Click here for the feature article in Crain’s Detroit

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