Honoring our mothers and fathers: from the first days of its organization in Detroit, the United Jewish Charities carried on the work of caring for the community’s most vulnerable and frail citizens.

From its humblest beginnings to the beautiful residences and vast array of services and programs for older adults, our community can be proud of the quality of care and resources that exist under the umbrella of today’s Jewish Senior Life.

The year was 1907

At a meeting of the UJC, members raised $69 and incorporated the “Jewish Old Folks Home”  for the purpose of providing care for the aged in a kosher environment.

Jewish Old Folks Home, c. 1920

 In 1908, the Jewish Old Folks Home Women’s Auxiliary was established; Mrs. J.L. Levitt served as its president for over 25 years. By 1910, $10,000 had been raised and a home on Brush and Winder was purchased. The Jewish Old Folks Home opened in 1912 and quickly filled to capacity. In 1915, a larger home at 318 Edmund Street was purchased. With capacity for 53 residents, The Edmund Place building served the Jewish community until 1937 when the state-of-the art new Jewish Home for the Aged was built on Petoskey in Detroit.

 

Oy, another winning hand at the Jewish Old Folks' Home

Oy, another winning hand at the Jewish Old Folks’ Home at Brush and Winder Streets. (Photo: circa 1950)

The year was 1945

The Jewish Children’s Home distributes its assets to the Jewish Home for the Aged. The Annex at the Petoskey Home  is established for 23 ambulatory elderly residents.

Sing-along at the Petosky Home

Sing-along at the Petoskey Home. (Photo: circa 1940’s)

The year was 1953

A new wing is approved, ultimately bringing the capacity at the Petoskey Home to 320.

 Reciting the Four Questions at the Petoskey Home

Why is this night different? Reciting the Four Questions at a Passover Seder at the Petoskey Home. (Photo: circa 1950)

The year was 1966

Borman Hall opened it doors to 50 residents, expanding services from the Petoskey Home for the Aged.

Dogs allowed at Borman Hall

All smiles at Borman Hall where canine visitors were always welcome. (Photo:1990)

The year was 1992

As residents age in place, Fleischman Residence/Blumberg Plaza accommodates their needs with companions and adaptive equipment.

At home at Fleishman Residence/Blumberg Plaza

At home at Fleishman Residence/Blumberg Plaza, Andrea Sanders visits resident William Feldman. (Photo: 1995)

Fleischman residents, Ida and David Kahn

Fleischman residents, Ida and David Kahn, stop for a kiss. (Photo: 1992)

The year was 1997

Jewish Home for Aged gets a new name – Jewish Home & Aging Services – to reflect the new mission of providing outreach support services.

Reaching out,  Carol Rosenberg chats with residents at Borman Hall

Reaching out, Carol Rosenberg chats with residents at Borman Hall (Photo: 1992)

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